The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the City of Fayetteville have both recently announced plans to conduct prescribed burns on land they manage.

Upcoming Prescribed Burns

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The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the City of Fayetteville have recently announced plans to conduct prescribed burns on land they manage.

A prescribed burn, also known as a controlled burn or planned fire, is a deliberately set and carefully controlled fire conducted under specific conditions to achieve predetermined land management objectives. This practice is carried out by trained professionals, such as land managers, foresters, or fire ecologists, in a controlled and systematic manner.

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Land managers use prescribed burns for various reasons, including:

  1. Ecosystem Health: Fire is a natural ecological process that has shaped many ecosystems over time. Some plant species have evolved to be fire-adapted, and regular fires can help maintain the health and diversity of certain ecosystems. Prescribed burns can mimic natural fire regimes and promote the growth of fire-adapted vegetation.
  2. Habitat Restoration: In some cases, prescribed burns are used to restore or enhance habitats for specific plant and animal species. For example, certain tree species may require periodic fires to open up space and encourage new growth. Additionally, some wildlife species depend on fire-maintained habitats for feeding or breeding.
  3. Invasive Species Control: Prescribed burns can be used to control the spread of invasive plant species that may outcompete native vegetation. Fire can disrupt the growth cycle of certain invasive plants and create conditions favorable to the re-establishment of native species.
  4. Reducing Fire Risk: By strategically burning vegetation under controlled conditions during less hazardous times, land managers can reduce the accumulation of combustible materials, such as dry grass and dead wood. This helps lower the risk of uncontrolled wildfires by decreasing the amount of fuel available.
  5. Forest Management: In forested areas, prescribed burns are often used as a tool for managing forest health and reducing the risk of catastrophic wildfires. By removing undergrowth and reducing the density of vegetation, prescribed burns can create firebreaks and reduce the intensity of future wildfires.
  6. Agricultural Benefits: In some agricultural settings, prescribed burns are employed to manage crop residues, control pests, and improve soil fertility. Burning crop residues can also help prepare fields for planting.
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It’s important to note that prescribed burns are conducted with careful planning and consideration of weather conditions, fuel moisture, and other factors to ensure that the fire remains under control and serves its intended purpose without posing a threat to people, property, or the environment. Prescribed burns are an important tool in land management and ecosystem restoration, and they play a key role in maintaining the health and resilience of diverse ecosystems.

The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the City of Fayetteville have both recently announced plans to conduct prescribed burns on land they manage.
The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the City of Fayetteville have recently announced plans to conduct prescribed burns on land they manage.

USACE Announcement:

“The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission will conduct prescribed burns on public lands surrounding Bull Shoals and Norfork Lakes from Dec.18, 2023 until April 12, 2024.

Locations scheduled for potential burning are C.R. 117 Peninsula, Dry Run Peninsula, Jones Point, Long Bottom, McCracken Ridge Peninsula, and Spring Creek on Bull Shoals Lake and Birdman, Chapin Point, Indian Head, and Woods Point on Norfork Lake

Prescribed burns will be conducted when weather conditions are favorable and will include timber stands and glade restoration areas. If you have hunting stands located at any of these locations, please remove them immediately.”

Fayetteville Annoucement:

“The City of Fayetteville will be conducting a prescribed burn on Monday, Dec. 18, at Woolsey Wet Prairie Sanctuary, a wetland mitigation site located immediately north of the West Side Wastewater Treatment Plant at 15 S. Broyles Ave.

The burn is scheduled to begin around 11 a.m. and will take two to four hours to complete. The burn will be on a 64.5-acre tract that borders the west side of Broyles Road, to the east of 54th Avenue and to the south of Persimmon Street.

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